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How to I get Oracle Certified?


RDBMS Fundamentals Series  
Total Time: 4 hours

Get 12-month access to all 1 courses listed below for only $59.95.

For a better value, buy the Package! Technical General contains this series and many more for only $119.95.

Check out all of our other course offerings and pricing!
View Package Pricing

This is a Recommended Prerequisite to the Oracle Series:
A basic understanding of how to retrieve information from relational databases using SQL


Total Time: 35 hours

Get 12-month access to all 6 courses listed below for only $59.95.

For a better value, buy the Package! Technical General contains this series and many more for only
$119.95.

Check out all of our other course offerings and pricing!
View Package Pricing


Total Time: 30 hours

Get 12-month access to all 7 courses listed below for only $59.95.

For a better value, buy the Package! Technical General contains this series and many more for only
$119.95.

Check out all of our other course offerings and pricing!
View Package Pricing


Total Time: 31 hours

Get 12-month access to all 10 courses listed below for only $59.95.

For a better value, buy the Package! Technical General contains this series and many more for only
$119.95.

Check out all of our other course offerings and pricing!
View Package Pricing


Computer History Museum How Databases Changed the World
Explore the amazing history of the database industry. Tune in to this Webcast from The Computer History Museum and hear stories from pioneering database leaders, including Oracle's
''Dr. DBA'' Ken Jacobs.
Oracle's Ken Jacobs Discusses How Databases Changed The World Dr. DBA joins distinguished panel at Computer History Museum event
          Play! (2 hrs.)

Ken Jacobs, Oracle vice president of product strategy for server technologies, participated in a panel discussion, "How Databases Changed the World" at the Computer History Museum.

Jacobs, a 22-year Oracle veteran known as "Dr. DBA", was joined by luminaries from Sybase, Informix, Ingres, Illustra, and IBM.

Panelists discussed how databases have changed the face of business, as well as key milestones, obstacles, and lessons learned.

Can you imagine a world without databases? Every time you withdraw cash from an ATM, make airline reservations, or charge something on your credit card, database systems are working behind the scenes. Since the dawning of the relational database model in 1970, and since the introduction of Oracle as the first commercial relational database system in 1979, database technology has evolved rapidly and now is essential to just about all transaction processing and business intelligence applications.

As part of continuing efforts to preserve industry history, the Computer History Museum hosted a panel discussion, "How Databases Changed the World," gathering database luminaries to reflect on the past and ponder the future. Panelists discussed how the database industry got started and how it has changed business, with some key milestones, obstacles, and lessons learned along the way.

Panelists include Oracle's Ken Jacobs, who has held a number of technical and management roles for Oracle since helping to establish the first Oracle office in Washington, DC in 1981. He's worked in consulting, support, product management, and product marketing. Ken has helped guide the development of the Oracle database product over the years, and has been an advocate inside the company for customers' interests.

Other panelists include: Chris Date, a well-known author whose books have popularized relational database technology; Herb Edelstein, independent consultant and author; Bob Epstein, the founder of Sybase; Pat Selinger, who contributed to IBM's original relational research and who now heads DB2 architecture and technology; Roger Sippl, the founder of Informix; Michael Stonebreaker, former UC Berkeley professor (now at MIT), and architect of Ingres and Postgres; and moderator George Schussel, the founder of DCI, a technology conference and expo company.


Edgar Codd, database theorist, dies at 79

 By Katie Hafner
The New York Times
April 23, 2003, 7:10 AM PT

Edgar F. Codd, a mathematician and computer scientist who laid the theoretical foundation for relational databases--the standard method by which information is organized in and retrieved from computers--died on Friday at his home in Williams Island, Fla. He was 79.

The cause was heart failure, said his wife, Sharon B. Codd.

Computers can store vast amounts of data. But before Codd's work found its way into commercial products, electronic databases were "completely ad hoc and higgledy-piggledy," said Chris Date, a database expert and former business partner of Codd's, who was known as Ted.

Codd's idea, based on mathematical set theory, was to store data in cross-referenced tables, allowing the information to be presented in multiple permutations. For instance, a user could ask the computer for a list of all baseball players from both the National League and the American League with batting averages over .300.

Relational databases now lie at the heart of systems ranging from hospitals' patient records to airline flights and schedules.

While working as a researcher at the IBM San Jose Research Laboratory in the 1960s and '70s, Codd wrote several papers outlining his ideas. To his frustration, IBM largely ignored his work, as the company was investing heavily at the time in commercializing a different type of database system.

"His approach was not, shall we say, welcomed with open arms at IBM," said Harwood Kolsky, a physicist who worked with Codd at IBM in the 1950s and '60s. "It was a revolutionary approach."

It was not until 1978 that Frank T. Cary, then chairman and chief executive of IBM, ordered the company to build a product based on Codd's ideas. But IBM was beaten to the market by Lawrence J. Ellison, a Silicon Valley entrepreneur, who used Codd's papers as the basis of a product around which he built a start-up company that has since become Oracle.

"The sad thing is that Ted never became rich out of his idea," Date said. "Other people did, but not Ted."

Edgar Frank Codd was born the youngest of seven children in Portland Bill, in Dorset, England, in 1923. His father was a leather manufacturer, his mother a schoolteacher.

He attended Oxford University on a full scholarship, studying mathematics and chemistry. During World War II, he was a pilot with the Royal Air Force. In 1948 he moved to New York and, hearing that IBM was hiring mathematicians, obtained a job there as a researcher.

A few years later, in 1953, angered by Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy's pursuit of Americans that he said had Communist ties or sympathies, Codd moved to Ottawa for several years.

After returning to the United States, he began graduate studies at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he received his doctorate in computer science in 1965. In 1967, he moved to California to work in the IBM San Jose Research Laboratory.

He and his first wife, Elizabeth, were divorced in 1978. In 1990, Codd married Sharon Weinberg, a mathematician and IBM colleague.

In 1981, he received the A. M. Turing Award the highest honor in the computer science field.

Codd is survived by his wife of Williams Island; a daughter, Katherine Codd Clark of Palo Alto, Calif.; three sons, Ronald of Alamo, Calif., Frank of Castro Valley, Calif., and David of Boca Raton, Fla.; and six grandchildren.


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